Category: meanwhile

Life as an Eritrean journalist

Last month, the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) declared that Eritrea is the world’s most censored country, worse even than North Korea or Turkmenistan. Their survey highlights the fact that independent media was banned in 2001; that at least 16 Eritrean journalists are behind bars, making the government the worst jailer of journalists in sub-Saharan

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This International Women’s Day, meet five writers who are changing the rules

“PEN is building on the Manifesto this year by highlighting the work of five women writers and activists who have been on the forefront of literature and free expression across the world. PEN is proud to highlight:” “Yirgalem Fisseha Mebrahtu, an Eritrean poet, journalist and writer. After the government closed all independent media in 2001,

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The Eritrean Diaspora is Unsettling its Autocratic Regime Through Social Media

“So far, the major achievement has been to demystify the seemingly ‘untouchable’ regime and conquer the pervasive fear.” “Since January, Eritrean social media, later amplified by the diaspora-based media that reach the country, has been generating a flood of calls to stand together in the face of the growing repression. Many have declared unanimously #EnoughIsEnough.

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This World Poetry Day Help Free Imprisoned Eritrean Poet and Journalist, Amanuel Asrat

Amanuel Asrat, is an award-winning Eritrean poet, critic, songwriter, and editor-in-chief of the leading newspaper ዘመን (Zemen, meaning The Times), has been detained incommunicado for over 16 years. Asrat was arrested at his home on the morning of 23 September 2001 amid a crackdown on state and private media. Other independent journalists, opposition politicians and students

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Whatever happened to Afwerki’s comely face? Eritrean music in an age of YouTube

When Eseyas “Haleka” Debesay (known for singing praise songs to the president) joined forces with the Yohannes sisters to upload a “patriotic” song that mocked the youth fleeing the country, for instance, the response was immediate. The video accumulated more than 30,000 “dislikes” in under a week, before the “dislike” and “like” buttons were disabled.

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